Rails jobs that are NOT using React?

Hello!

I see a lot of job postings for Rails jobs also mention React. I don't love or hate React. Sometimes I think it's overkill, though. Then there's Redux... and TypeScript... and...

I work at a company with a core Rails app that has a concoction of Backbone, React, then files like RABL, CoffeeScript... it's like a core-sample of the app's history.

Have y'all seen many Rails gigs that are close to "vanilla" rails, sticking to server-side rendering, `html.erb`, or even, perhaps using StimulusJS?

Or do you work at one?

I think people still favor Rails' opinionated framework, even if only using the API/ORM, but it seems the "super complex front-end" is still very appealing to people.

14 thoughts on “Rails jobs that are NOT using React?”

  1. I feel your pain.

    I’m hoping that Hotwire goes some way to mitigating this, as it is fairly awesome.

    Sadly, I’m afraid I can’t recommend an employer, however.

    Reply
  2. Yeah, I really wanna get familiar with Hotwire, but currently, it’s challenging to make time outside of work for even more coding/learning.

    Reply
  3. Most of these companies are awash with VC money to burn. probably as a result of the Fed printing the dollar and dishing it out like confetti + controlling the price of tender: the need or desire for simplicity is not there: in the good ol’ days you had $5 to make a website, and it HAD to start generating returns. nowadays, you can afford to burn: $200m in shareholder capital with nothing to show for it. you can have HUGE +5 year run ways and every reason to bike-shed a simple form/ui design before a committee of 70 developers into a complex system of react components + state management + bundling and transpiling, with endless debates about font-sizes and colour co-oordination, or whether we should use SuperSexyStateManagementJS to handle this etc.

    but if you want fast, effective, cheap, with limitations and simple: nothing beats Stimulus, Turbo, and simple rails helpers: it allows a small team (or solo developer) to generate enormous value on a good wicket.

    Reply
  4. I understand what you mean. Simplicity is underrated. What initially hooked me to ruby and rails is writing code with developer happines in mind. And after flirting with a few other lanuages and framworks, I just go back to what makes me most happy and productive.

    And about jobs. We just hired another dev today for our 7-year old rails app. Our stack is a simple, yet powerful. Rails, hotwire, stimulus and tailwindcss.

    Reply
  5. At my current gig it’s mostly standard rails. It’s got haml with standard views and some view components. It’s so easy to work with and does everything we need.

    My last gig had the same problem you just mentioned. They started replacing an old rails cms with a rails/react application. About 5% of the app actually needed something like react for the fancy client side stuff, yet they used it for the entire frontend.

    Reply
  6. We are somewhat vanilla when it comes to front-end, with stimulus-js/stimulus-reflex. Stimulus-reflex being the more complicated end. That does stick to server side rendering, but some may call it complex as it uses websockets etc. I like it. Pretty easy when you figure it out

    Reply
  7. I work in Stimulus daily, but that’s because I upgraded the entire application from Rails 3 to Rails 6 and had to get away from jQuery. I think React is overkill for a lot of applications too, but I’m not gonna lie there are a lot of great websites out there with React.

    Reply
  8. All of our new full-stack projects (I.e. started from zero) are Rails+Hotwire – we’re avoiding ReactJS (or Vue/Ember/etc) unless strictly necessary. Otherwise, we get distracted a lot.

    Reply
  9. Hey, what are your position expectations? We have a Principal Level opening at Brightcove (two levels above senior) for a project with Rails and Elixir, with flexible remote (meaning that if needed you could be fully remote, only required to be in the US)

    Reply
  10. Living in Europe I have recently look for a new job and among all company I had interview 50% of them was on stimulus and 50 other % were on react/vuejs.

    Don’t know for US but in Europe lot of rails developer love to follow DHH/basecamp mindset

    Reply
  11. I think React is overkill 99% of the times. The reasoning for using a frontend framework next to Rails is often the following: “This way we can split the work 50/50 between backend / frontend developers.”

    However (this might be an unpopular opinion) with tailwind, frontend has become so incredibly easy that it’s almost as simple to just write a erb-frontend than to maintain an api that the frontend can use. It slows you down because you introduce an extra communication layer between backend/frontend.

    Hotwire makes rails frontend just as “snappy” as a SPA.

    Reply
  12. What about pure backend jobs, where you are building API (consumed by either separate frontend app or different services)? Might be easier to find. I actually had more jobs like this than any other kind.

    Reply
  13. I work in the commercial area of a software factory. I’m not a developer myself, but from what I’ve seen and heard, it’s becoming very popular to set up the backends on RoR and connect them with React SPAs. Hope this helps you in any way

    Reply

Leave a Comment